Diamine Shimmmering inks – 2017 Edition. An overview

…Shiny…Watch me dazzle like a diamond in the rough Strut my stuff; my stuff is so… Shiny

Well, well, well….Here it is – Shimmeristic ink 2017 edition from Diamine. To be absolutely honest, I was wondering 2-3 months ago if Diamine is going to release more glittery inks this year and obviously they did. This makes now 32 shimmering inks in total, which is a lot (please check my previous reviews here and here). Is it good? well, depending on point of view. Each batch released this year and last two years offer vast selection of colours mixed with either silver or gold particles suspended in the bas ink, so everyone could easily pick favourable colour. However, if you are new to shimmering inks such large collection may be overwhelming and cause a headache if you like to pick only one.

Continue reading

Shimmer and Shine, inky divine – De Atramentis Pearlescent inks

Autumn and Winter seem to be a good seasons for glittery inks. I am not sure why is that, but this is how I found it over last few years. It is almost tradition now that ink manufacturer like Diamine releases set of new shimmeristic colours around this period. This just happened making respectable set of 30+ Diamine Shimmeristic inks in totalz. J Herbin has different strategy here and they are releasing only one ink per year, but long awaited colour of 1670 series. We are almost floded with glittery shiny inks this year, but obviously it has to be a large demand for such specific inks, so another brand is trying to step in and be recognised in this field. More specyfically – De Atramentis with their collection of Pearlescent inks. Accordingly, to the De Atramentis website, they offer currently ten different colours where each of them has three variations depending on what type of flecks (silver, gold or copper) are suspended in it. This makes 30 inks already, which I personally found a lot! Cool thing about these inks in general is that different particles are changing the overall shade of the base colour, sometimes significantly. Silver particles give frosty cold appearance, whereas Gold and Copper are much warmer.

Thanks to Scribble at UnitedInkdom I received 9 of them to play: Camelien Red, Brilliant Violet, Cyan Blue and Amber Yellow.

Continue reading

My impressions on Platinum Classic (‘iron gall’) inks

Hello. It was very busy summer, which unfortunately is nearly finished. Due to amount of day job workflow I had,  I was a little bit quiet on ClumsyPenman site recently. But it does not mean, that I was not working on my reviews. In fact, I was working a lot and I will be posting many hopefully interesting things in next coming weeks. Today is one of them. Platinum Classic Series Inks. I hope you will enjoy it.  Here it is.

 

Earlier this year Platinum has announced and introduced set of six new inks which really brought my attention. Most of the colours in the new ‘Classic’ line are earthy and natural looking muted shades of green, brown, sepia, burgundy and yellow, which I really like. There is no secret that I love earthy colours. There is something cool about them and they usually look adorable on creamy/ivory toned paper….somehow ‘vintage’.

Another very interesting thing about this series is the fact that according to the Platinum  all of the inks are manufactured by the ‘traditional methods’ and more importantly they are gradually darkening overtime. This obviously screams – ‘Iron Gall’ inks, however Platinum never used this term on their website. I am not entirely sure how Platinum synthesize these inks but in the nut shell ‘iron gall’ inks are obtained from the chemical reaction of tannins extracted from galls (for instance oak) and aqueous solution of  iron (II) sulfate. Because formed Fe(+2) complex is quite unstable in oxygen condition the iron Fe(+2) atoms oxidise quickly to Fe(+3) which manifests by ink darkening. This effect is very similar to rust formation and corrosion we see around very often. To improve flow and other physical and chemical  properties binders such as Arabic gum, stabilisers, anti-mould reagents are often used.

This is an example how oxydation process occurs and how it is affecting the colour (note the video speed is 2x)

In general iron gall inks need to be used with caution, because their acidic pH can make an effect on metal parts of the pen (steel nib, metal section, etc). It was really a problem the past, but nowadays IG inks are significantly less ‘corrosive’, however I do not have any experimental pH data for this particular set so can not say for sure. As a general rule is rather recommended to maintain pen regularly (use and clean). It is also suggested not to use very expensive pens either. For more information about Iron Gall inks I would highly recommend to check irongall.org website.

Continue reading

KWZ meta (mega) review

Hi,

As a part of collective bunch of reviewers under UnitedInkdom umbrella, I have just finished quite extensive (and hopefully comprehensive) metareview of the KWZ inks. This meta-review summarises number of independent reviews of KWZ Inks made by my ‘partners in crime’.

We have tested number of KWZ inks in total and we looked at them from different perspectives.  We shown all positive and negative aspects of these interesting and quite unique inks. Interestingly our opinions were sometimes divided and even contradictory, which is not necessarily bad thing, because it shows how different opinions on the same product may be, depending on person and approach taken. 

I hope you will enjoy reading it.

KWZ inks meta-review

Save

Save

Save

Save

‘…back to the roots’ – testing small portable notebooks – Prolog

Just before Easter, I received a small cool looking box full of goodies, kindly sent by Stewart from Pocket Notebooks which is a small British company who makes a great deal about portable good quality notebooks. The mission they have to bring back the power of hand written notes is very important and very close to my heart. The Pocket Notebooks slogan is:  Forget the App, there’s a Pocket Notebook for that … and I can’t agree more. This is actually why I am here dealing with inks and pens. This is why I returned to use fountain pens, which quickly became my passion three, or four years ago. I was using my tablet, phone and notebook as much, that one day I have realised  that I am missing something very important to me which I used to like a lot – a handwriting.

For heavy testing  purposes (which I did ! )  Stewart sent me a bunch of different notebooks he has in his store, made by different people and companies. Some of them are ‘big’ and ‘very small’ and here ‘small’ not necessarily means bad. Some of these notebooks are really good but also some are not that cool as they meant to be. But that is life, and I really appreciate the fact that I can compare them together side by side.

So, what I got? Well, I got seven notebooks total and I think they cover quite nicely a wide spectrum of different paper types, built and quality, which for me and as end user is one of the most important things. I got three Fieldnote size notebooks: ClaireFontaine Retro Nova, Story Supply  Co and Inky Fingers, then I got two completely different ones from Curnow Bookbinding & Leatherwork which have interesting size in between Fielnote and Midori passport. The last one is a fairly small but handy pocket notebook from Silvine. I will split this post into parts (likely 4) where I present some tests I did and what I honestly think about them.

Continue reading

J. Herbin – Vert Olive and other

Hi,

Just a quick update. My review of J. Herbin – Vert Olive ink is live, so please have a look. Possibly not for everyone, but still this is very interesting ink and colour.

There is quite few different reviews in the pipeline on the write up stage being very close to completion. These are (in no particular order):

Paper:

  • Taroko notebooks with Tomoe River paper

Inks

  • J. Herbin – Lie de The
  • J. Herbin – Larmes de cassis
  • KWZ – Flame Red
  • KWZ – Grey Plum

Pens

  • Pelikan M805 (F)
  • Platinium Century 3776 (Soft Fine)

….so, stay tuned folks 🙂

Robert Oster Signature inks

Just a quick update tonight.

Two reviews of very cool inks from Robert Oster Signature line: Direct Sun and Barossa Grape are done and live since last few days. These two reviews are part of the larger collaborative meta-review of Robert Oster Signature  you may find already at the United Inkdom blog .

 

Robert Oster inks are gaining popularity among fountain pen users recently and there are many reasons why. They are really good quality inks with beautiful and well saturated colours representing Australian landscape. I have reviewed so far only two from quote extensive palette of colours which Rober Oster has in his offer, but I am looking forward to have a look at many more in the future. They are definitely worth checking and using.

(*)  Free samples of Robert Oster  inks I  reviewed were kindly provided by iZods.ink in the UK, who already has them in stock.

Some ‘inky’ news…

I hope you had yesterday a truly great Fountain Pen Day. Did you buy anything? Did you win anything from various raffle a giveaway contests flying around? I hope so. If not, I hope you at least enjoyed it as I did.

There are number of things going on at the InkFusion site at the moment. First of all, I joined the United Inkdom team. If you have not heard about this collaborative project, please visit the United Inkdom blog. United Inkdom is a stationery news and reviews site…but not ordinary one. All reviews posted there are compiled from other reviews made few other reviewers based in the UK (as me for instance) into one large meta review which combines all thoughts, observations and comments on particular stationary item seen from different angles. Pretty cool idea…huh? 

So, in relation to this, I am currently working on bunch of ink reviews. The first set I got is five inks by Kaweco : Sunrise Orange, Paradise Blue, Summer Purple, Ruby Red and Palm Green. I have just finished ‘wet’ part of these reviews. Now I need to go through hundreds of pictures I took, select 30-40 for each ink and wrap up all my thoughts and observations. Hopefully, I will be posting reviews of each ink one by one within next week or two tops, so stay tuned.

untitled-1

untitled-2

There is also few KWZ inks reviews pending like Brown pink, Grapefruit.

untitled-1

untitled-1

Save

Save

Save

Save

KWZ Ink – Azure #3

Hello,

If you  are missing summer seaside holidays at some remote blue lagoon already, check the clumsy-review of adorable ink from KWZ  called Azure #3. Check this out!

 

New haul of inks

untitled-2

Finally, I got a full bottle of most anticipated and absolutely beautiful ink this year which is J. Herbin 1670 edition – Caroube de Chypre (see review). I bought also a new bottle of Rouge Hematite also by  J. Herbin (see review). This is my second bottle of this fantastic ink and I believe not the last one. The same will be with the Caroube de Chypre. Is simply stunning! It flows. It has golden flecks and it shows crazy looking, bright, almost ‘toxic’ green sheen.

20160520-Herbin Caroube de Chypre20160520-Herbin Rouge Hematite

 

Thanks to Mishka from BureauDirect UK, where I purchased these two beauties I also got also a ‘goodie bag’ containing set of free samples of few more J.Herbin inks I will be dealing with in coming weeks. Moreover, she was so kind and sent me some samples of KWZ inks which are manufactured by Polish chemist Konrad Żurawski (see KWZ colour palette…impressive). I was ‘contemplating’ these inks for a while now. I cannot wait to test them ‘my way’. I have beautiful golden-brown ‘Honey’, ‘Foggy green’ and superb ‘Turquoise’ which in fact is an ‘iron gall‘ ink.

…being a chemist and fountain pen and ink enthusiast, I would be awesome to meet with Konrad and have a chat. Stuff he does looks very cool, indeed.

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save